Skip to content

Adding Sugar to Beer - BrewChatter LIVE June 13th, 2020

Join us as we talk about different Brewing Sugars and dding them to homebrew and see the Show Notes below!
Adding Sugar to Beer Show Notes
  • Welcome/Thank Everyone for joining.  Thank all Eventbrite Users and invite them to DM us for a 25% OFF Promo Code for their next order
  • Brief overview of adding sugar to fermentation, maybe touch on types of sugar, including fruit puree, that we would use
  • What we are drinking, both on tap and the special bottle we decide on (Josh’s Mead)
  • What are you drinking/what’s everyone brewing
  • Store Updates
    • Store Opening Event
      • Date
      • What we’re doing
      • Make sure that you join the event 
    • Nevada BrewChallenge
      • Drop Off’s starting Monday
      • Tentative plans for judging, awards festival
    • BrewChatter Rentals

Adding Sugar to Beer

  • Begin with why you would add sugar to fermentation
    • Fruit Beers
    • Traditional Belgian Styles
    • IPA’s and Pale Ales
    • Boost gravity after a fuck up on brew day
  • What does adding extra sugar to fermentation accomplish
    • Boosts gravity
    • Adds a perception of dryness (Belgians, IPAs)
    • Add an extra dimension of flavor and character
  • What Types of sugar would you add to a fermentation
    • Start with Fruit Purees and wine bases (Don’t go too crazy here because we already did a show just on these)
      • Use fruited IPAs, Ciders and Melomel style meads as primary examples
        • Touch again on Sparks is Fruity
    • Move into Dextrose for IPAs
      • Difference Between Dextrose and Cane (cane ferments hotter, leaves more higher alcohol characteristics)
      • Keep it at a 10% maximum so it doesn’t overtake the flavor
      • Adds a perception of drieness - like in Pliny
    • Talk about adding Lactose
      • When to add it
      • How to add it (end of boil or dissolved in water in the keg if you want more control)
      • Describe the flavor??
    • Talk about maltodextrin
      • Adds body and almost no flavor
      • Can be a valuable tool for fixing a thin bodied beer when used correctly
      • How to add it (dissolved in water at packaging)
    • Move into Candi Sugars
      • Pros and cons of adding them into fermentation vs the boil kettle
        • Fermentation additions allow you to build you yeast up
          • Talk about some of the beers that we’ve done using this method and why.  Touch on the Belgian Josh did with year old yeast and why it worked using this method
        • Boil kettle additions and why you’d choose either one
      • Different Types - all give about 32 ppg - divide that by 5.5 (ferm volume) and you get 5.18 points per pound of sugar per 5.5 gallons
        • Blanc Dry - Must dissolve in water before adding.  LIght, caramel and fruity flavor to beer and dry it out
        • SImplicity - Already liquid so easy to add to fermentation.  Adds a refreshing, subtle flavor somewhere between citrus and honey
        • Golden - Already liquid so easy to add to fermentation.  Adds pronounced caramel and fruit - like a fruit cup!
        • D45 - Already liquid so easy to add to fermentation.  Adds distinct caramel, vanilla and toasted bread characteristics.  It’s in our Swarzbier for this reason!
        • D90 - Already liquid so easy to add to fermentation.  Mild, dark chocolate, dark stone fruits like plum, hints of toffee, coffee, toasted bread
        • D180 - Already liquid so easy to add to fermentation.  Fresh ground coffee, wild cherry and dark stone fruits with hints of caramel and toasted bread.
        • D240 - Already liquid so easy to add to fermentation.  Darkest available.  Rich and smooth with dark raisin, dark stone fruits, roasted dark caramel and toffee.
        • What the hell is a dark stone fruit??  Examples 
          • Dark Plums
          • Cherries/Black Cherries
          • Blackberries
          • Mulberries
          • Dates
          • Pluots
      • Move to Honey - Honey is a super versatile sugar addition to any fermentation.  Rule of thumb that 1 lb in 5 gallons adds 1% abv
        • Don’t go above 110° F when adding - many brewers make the mistake of adding into the boil, but you will get a lot more out of either adding it into fermentation (dissolved in water) or 
          • Making a bouchet to more formally caramelize the sugars in the honey
        • Not all honey is created equal.  The better the honey, the better the end product.  
        • What we’ve added honey to and enjoyed - bring up the mead we’re drinking, pros and cons of the honey we used, how we’d do it differently or not
        • Adding to cider - how much and how important to the overall character
        • Best beer styles to add honey to, how and how much
        • Honey takes longer to come through in beer, otherwise has a similar effect to adding simple sugar - dries it out and gives a perception of dryness